Personal tools
You are here: Home Apply for resources PRACE successful Swedish applications

PRACE successful Swedish applications

This page contains information about projects with Swedish participation that received allocations on the PRACE compute resources.

 For SNIC-PRACE Digest please click here or here.

All successful applications for PRACE Tier-0 access and PRACE Tier-0 Preparatory Access are listed on the PRACE web pages.

PRACE publishes various project statistics for Tier-0 access. This includes tables and graphs that represent the awarded projects per country and the awarded computing time per country. PRACE updates these statistics periodically, adding information on the outcome Calls for Proposals as they become available.

Below you find the successful applications that were submitted by a Swedish researcher as project leader (PI) for the following calls:

  • Tier-0 Regular Access: Call 1 - Call 14
  • Tier-0 Preparatory Access: 1st - 23th cut-off evaluation
  • Type D (Tier-1 for Tier0) Preparatory Access
  • Tier-1 access: DECI-7 - DECI-14
  • SHAPE: SME HPC Adoption Programme in Europe: Call 1 - Call 3

 


 

PRACE TIER-0 REGULAR ACCESS WITH SWEDISH PROJECT LEADER

Seven applications with a Swedish project leader have been accepted for Tier-0 access. Successful applications with Swedish collaborators (but not with a Swedish project leader) are not listed on this page.


Call 2 (Tier-0)

Start date allocation: 1 May 2011; Allocation period: 1 year

  • Project title: REFIT - Rotation effects on flow instabilities and turbulence
  • Project leader: Arne Johansson, KTH Department of Mechanics, Sweden
  • Collaborators: Dr. Geert Brethouwer, KTH Stockholm, SWEDEN; Prof. Dan Henningson, KTH Stockholm, SWEDEN; Prof. Rebecca Lingwood, University of Cambridge, UNITED KINGDOM; Prof. Martin Oberlack, Technische Universität Darmstadt; GERMANY; Dr. Philipp Schlatter, KTH Stockholm, SWEDEN.
  • Resource awarded: 46 000 000 core hours on JUGENE (GAUSS/FZJ, Germany)
  • Abstract: Flows in gas turbines, turbo machinery, pumps, compressors, cyclone separators and other industrial apparatus are often rotating or swirling. They are also usually turbulent since flow rates and thus Reynolds numbers are generally large, meaning that the fluid motions fluctuate in a chaotic and irregular manner in space and time. The induced Coriolis force on the fluid or gas, also occurring when there is a flow over wings, turbine blades and other curved surfaces, causes many intriguing and complex physical phenomena. Coriolis forces, for example, can damp as well as enhance the turbulent fluctuations and influence the mean flow rate. Capturing such effects in engineering turbulence models has so far proved to be elusive and in order to improve and validate those models high quality data of rotating turbulent flows are badly needed. Experiments on rotating flows are inherently complicated since it usually requires turning of equipment. A viable and potentially very accurate alternative is direct numerical simulation (DNS) whereby the whole spatial and temporal range of turbulent scales are resolved without invoking models. Rotating channel flow is particularly relevant from a fundamental and engineering perspective. Recent DNSs in our group have revealed interesting phenomena in channel flows at high rotation rates; turbulence is then damped near both channel walls and the flow can become partly or completely laminar leading to huge flow rate changes at a constant pressure drop. Moreover, preliminary DNS uncovered an instability not observed previously in rotating wall-bounded flows. This instability caused large fluctuations in the turbulence intensity and wall shear stresses in a periodic-like manner. Although previous DNSs of rotating channel flow have produced invaluable information, they were restricted to low Reynolds numbers, Re, since the range of scales that needs to be resolved and thus the computational costs of DNS increase dramatically with Re. The results of those previous DNS cannot simply be extrapolated to industrial flows with a commonly much higher Reynolds number. However, with the resources provided by the PRACE project we are able to perform simulations of rotating turbulent flows at a much higher Reynolds number. Proper simulations of the periodic-like instabilities at high rotation rates and high Re will require especially massive computational resources. The aim of the proposed project is therefore to perform DNS of rotating turbulent channel flow at an order of magnitude higher friction Reynolds number than previously performed DNS. In particular, the goal is to carry out the first well-resolved DNS of the periodic-like instabilities occuring at high rotation rates since they can potentially have an important impact in industrial applications. Those new large-scale DNS can help to address unresolved questions about rotation, swirl and streamline curvature effects in industrial flows. The computed high Reynolds number DNS data are also vital in order to develop and validate engineering models for turbulent flows with rotation, swirl or streamline curvature in industrial applications and to study instabilities in rotating flows. The DNS data will therefore be made available to the wider scientific community.

 

Call 4 (Tier-0)

Start date allocation: 1 May 2012; Allocation period: 1 year

  • Project title: Direct numerical simulation of reaction fronts in partially premixed charge compression ignition combustion: structures, dynamics
  • Project leader: Xue-Song Bai, Lund University, Sweden
  • Collaborators: Yu Rixin, Lund University, SWEDEN; Henning Carlsson, Lund University, SWEDEN; Fan Zhang, Lund University, SWEDEN; Rickard Solsjo, Lund University, SWEDEN.
  • Resource awarded: 20 000 000 core hours on CURIE TN (GENCI@CEA, France)
  • Abstract: Recent public concerns on global warming due to emissions of the green house gas CO2, as well as emission of pollutants (soot, NOx, CO, and unburned hydrocarbons) from fossil fuel combustion, have called for development of improved internal combustion (IC) engines that have high engine efficiency, low emissions of pollutants, and friendly to carbon neutral renewable fuels (e.g. biofuels). The European and world engine industry and research community have spent great effort in developing clean combustion engines using the concept of fuel-lean mixture and low temperature combustion which offers great potential in reducing NOx (due to low temperature) and soot and unburned hydrocarbon (due to excessive air), and meanwhile achieving high engine efficiency. One example is the well-known homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion engine, which operates with excessive air in the cylinder, and produces simultaneously low soot and NOx. However, HCCI combustion is found to be very sensitive to the flow and mixture conditions prior to the onset of auto-ignition. As a result, HCCI engine is rather difficult to control. At high load (with high temperature and high pressure) engine knock may occur with pressure waves in the cylinder interacting with the reaction fronts, causing excessive noise and even mechanical damage. At low load (with lower temperature and pressure) high level emissions of CO and unburned hydrocarbon may occur, which lowers the fuel economy and pollutes the environment. Recently, it has been demonstrated experimentally that with partially premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) which can be attained by using multiple injections of fuel at different piston positions, smoother combustion can be achieved by managing the local fuel/air ratio (thereby the ignition delay time) in an overall lean charge.

    There are several technical barriers in applying the PCCI concept to practical engines running with overall fuel-lean mixture, low temperature combustion. For example, it is not known what the optimized partially premixed charge is for a desirable ignition, while at the same time maintaining low emissions. The main difficulty lies in the non-linear behavior of the dominating phenomena and the interaction among them (e.g. chemistry and turbulence). To develop an applicable PCCI technology for IC-engine industry, improved understanding of the multiple scale physical and chemical process is necessary. Further, there is a need to develop computational models for simulating the process for the design where a large number of control parameters are to be investigated. 

    The goals of this project are to achieve improved understanding of the physical and chemical processes in overall fuel-lean PCCI processes, and to generate reliable database for validating simulation models for analysis of the class of combustion problems. This shall lead to development of new strategies to achieve controllable low temperature combustion IC-engines, while maintaining high efficiency and low levels of emissions (soot, NOx, CO and unburned hydrocarbons). Direct numerical simulation (DNS) approach that employs detailed chemistry and transport properties will be employed.

 

Call 5 (Tier-0)

Start date allocation: 1 November 2012; Allocation period: 1 year

  • Project title: HiResClim : High Resolution Climate Modelling
  • Project leader: Colin Jones, Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI), Sweden
  • Collaborators: Laurent Terray, CERFACS, FRANCE | Sophie Valcke, CERFACS, FRANCE | Eric Maisonnave, CERFACS, FRANCE | Christophe Cassou, CERFACS, FRANCE | Klaus Wyser, Swedish Meterological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI), SWEDEN | Uwe Fladrich, Swedish Meterological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI), SWEDEN | Muhammad Asif, Catalan Institute of Climate Sciences, SPAIN | Domingo Manubens, Catalan Institute of Climate Sciences, SPAIN | Francisco Doblas-Reyes, Catalan Institute of Climate Sciences, SPAIN | Chandan Basu, Linkoping University, SWEDEN | Torgny Faxen, Linkoping University, SWEDEN | Wilco Hazeleger, Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), NETHERLANDS | Richard Bintanja, Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), NETHERLANDS | Camiel Severijns, Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), NETHERLANDS.
  • Resource awarded: 38 000 000 core hours on MareNostrum (BSC, Spain)
  • Abstract: HiResClim aims to make major advances in the science of climate change modelling . This will be achieved by addressing the dual requirements of; increased climate model resolution and increased number of ensemble realizations of future climate conditions for a range of plausible socio-economic development pathways. Increased model resolution aims to deliver a significant improvement in our ability to simulate key modes of climate and weather variability and thereby provide reliable estimates of future changes in this variability. A large ensemble approach acknowledges the inherent uncertainty in estimating long-term changes in climate, particularly in phenomena that are highly variable and, of which, changes in the occurrence of the rare but intense events are those impacting society and nature most strongly. To provide credible risk assessment statistics on future change in phenomena such as; extra-tropical and tropical cyclones, heatwaves, droughts and flood events, the combination of high climate model resolution and a large ensemble approach is unavoidable. In HiResClim we attack both of these requirements in a balanced approach, which, as well as being the most efficient way to utilise the most advanced HPC systems of today, is also the only path to providing more robust and actionable estimates of future climate change.

 

Call 5 (Tier-0)

Start date allocation: 1 November 2012; Allocation period: 1 year

  • Project title: Simulating the Epoch of Re-ionization for LOFAR
  • Project leader: Garrelt Mellema, Stockholm University, Sweden
  • Collaborators: Ilian Iliev, University of Sussex, UNITED KINGDOM | William Watson, University of Sussex, UNITED KINGDOM | Saleem Zaroubi, University of Groningen, NETHERLANDS | Alexandros Papageorgiou, University of Groningen, NETHERLANDS | Hannes Jensen, Stockholm University, SWEDEN | Kai-Yan Lee, Stockholm University, SWEDEN.
  • Resource awarded: 3 000 000 core hours on Curie FN and 19 000 000 core hours on Curie TN (GENCI@CEA, France)
  • Abstract: Reionization is believed to be the outcome of the release of ionizing radiation by early galaxies. Due to the complex nature of the reionization process it is best studied through numerical simulations. Such simulations present considerable challenges related to the large dynamic range required and the necessity to perform fast and accurate radiative transfer calculations. The tiny galaxies which are the dominant contributors of ionizing radiation must be resolved in volumes large enough to derive their numbers and clustering properties correctly, as both of these strongly impact the corresponding observational signatures. The ionization fronts expanding from all these millions of galaxies into the surrounding neutral medium must then be tracked with a 3D radiative transfer method which includes the solution of non-equilibrium chemical rate equations. The combination of these requirements makes this problem a formidable computational task. We propose to perform several simulations with the main goal to simulate, for the very first time the full, very large volume of the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) survey of the European radio interferometer array LOFAR, while at the same time including all essential types of ionizing sources, from normal galaxies to QSOs. The structure formation data will be provided by N-body simulation of early structure formation with 8192^3 (550 billion) particles and 500/h Mpc volume. This combination of large volume and high resolution will allow us to study the multi-scale reionization process, including effects which are either spatially very rare (e.g. luminous QSO sources, bright Lyman-alpha line-emitters) or for which the characteristic length scales are large (e.g. X-ray sources of photoionization and heating; the soft UV that radiatively pumps the 21-cm line by Lyman-alpha scattering; the H_2-dissociating UV background).This structure formation simulation will be used in the LOFAR Epoch of Reionization Key Science Project to construct a large library of reionization simulations on non-PRACE facilities and will be essential in the interpretation of the LOFAR observations. On Curie we will use the structure formation results to perform a reionization simulation which will address the likely stochastic nature of the sources of reionization, an aspect that to date has not been explored. We will also study the effects from the early rise of the inhomogeneous X-ray background. The forming early galaxies, and the stars and accreting black holes within them emit copious amounts of radiation in all spectral bands, which in turn affects future star and galaxy formation. There are multiple channels for such feedback which need to be taken into account, an important one of which are the subtle, but far-reaching effects of X-rays which strongly modulate the redshifted 21-cm emission and absorption signals at early times.

 

Call 8 (Tier-0)

Start date allocation: 1 May 2014; Allocation period: 1 year

  • Project title: FENICS-HPC - High performance adaptive finite element methods for turbulent flow and multiphysics with applications to aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, biomedicine and geophysics
  • Project leader: Prof. Johan Hoffman, Department of High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz), KTH, Sweden
  • Collaborators: Cem Degirmenci, Johan Jansson, Niclas Jansson, Aurelien Larcher, KTH, SWEDEN
  • Resource awarded: 10 000 000 core hours on Hermit (GCS@HLRS, Germany) and 10.000.000 core hours on SuperMUC (GCS@LRZ, Germany)
  • Abstract: This project concerns the development of parallel computational methods for solving turbulent fluid flow problems with focus on industrial applications, such as the aerodynamics of a full aircraft at realistic flight conditions, the sound generated by the turbulent flow past the aircraft during landing and takeoff, the blood flow inside a human heart and geophysical flows. The massive computational cost for resolving all turbulent scales in such problems makes Direct Numerical Simulation of the underlying Navier-Stokes equations impossible. Instead, various approaches based on partial resolution of the flow have been developed, such as Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations or Large-Eddy simulation (LES). For these methods new questions arise: what is the accuracy of the approximation, how fine scales have to be resolved, and what are the proper boundary conditions? To answer such questions, a number of challenges have to be addressed simultaneously in the fields of fluid mechanics, mathematics, numerical analysis and HPC.

 

Call 8 (Tier-0)

Start date allocation: 1 May 2014; Allocation period: 1 year

  • Project title: EGOIST - Endogenic oil synthesis in the deep Earth interior: ab initio molecular dynamics study
  • Project leader: Prof. Anatoly Belonoshko, Department of Theoretical Physics, KTH, Sweden
  • Collaborators: Pavel Gavryushkin, V.S. Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch, RAS, RUSSIAN FEDERATION; Konstantin Litasov, V.S. Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch, RAS, RUSSIAN FEDERATION; Tymofiy Lukinov, KTH, SWEDEN
  • Resource awarded: 50 000 000 core hours on MareNostrum (BSC, Spain)
  • Abstract: Physics and chemistry of C-O-H fluids at high pressures and temperatures of Earth interior is important in several applications. First, the thermodynamics of these fluids is needed to describe properties of the Earth interior which, in turn, might be important for predicting seismic events. Second, estimating the balance of CO2 between atmosphere and Earth interior is impossible without detailed knowledge of thermodynamics of C-O-H fluids. Third, there are indications from experiment that chemical reactions in C-O-H fluids at high P and T might lead to a synthesis of hydrocarbons and heavy alkanes, providing a possibility for formation of oil deposits at the relevant depth. Experimental difficulties in studying C-O-H fluids at high PT are numerous - for example, diffusion of H2 is one of them. Therefore, a theoretical approach is a valuable asset in these studies. Presently, we can compute phase and chemical equilibrium using density functional theory and molecular dynamics. When combined together, they represent a powerful tool. We shall study various components in C-O-H system, systematically collecting data on their equations of state to use for computing, in turn, their Gibbs free energy. Minimization of the Gibbs free energy allows to determine chemical composition at equilibrium as soon as thermodynamics of all possible components is available. DFT based MD is similar in a way to a high PT experiment, yet without experimental problems. While theoretical approach has its own limitations, they are well known and understood. Thus, we expect that the acquired knowledge of thermodynamics, phase and chemical equilibrium in C-O-H system will be highly reliable. In a way, our simulations are similar to a real experiment - we shall place a certain composition into an experimental box and apply certain pressure and temperature. That will allow us to observe the chemical composition that forms in the ’experimental’ chamber. We expect to observe chemical reactions that lead to formation of hydrocarbons and alkanes and describe the range of pressures, temperatures and compositions where these reactions occur. This, in turn, might enable an educated search for the regions in the Earth interior that might contain the products of this reaction. As a spin-off, the acquired knowledge will help us to solve the problem of excessive CO2 as well as to understand the interior of icy planets and sattelites of giant planets.

 

Call 8 (Tier-0)

Start date allocation: 1 May 2014; Allocation period: 1 year

  • Project title: Direct numerical simulation of partially premixed combustion in internal combustion engine relevant conditions
  • Project leader: Prof. Xue-Song Bai, Department of Engineering, Lund University, Sweden
  • Collaborators: Henning Carlsson, Vivianne Holmen, Siyuan Hu, Rickard Solsjo, Rixin Yu, Lund University, SWEDEN
  • Resource awarded: 26 000 000 core hours on SuperMUC (GCS@LRZ, Germany)
  • Abstract: In the past decade, the European and world engine industry and research community have spent a great effort in developing clean combustion engines using the concept of fuel-lean mixture and low temperature combustion which offers great potential in reducing NOx (due to low temperature), soot and unburned hydrocarbon (due to excessive air), and meanwhile achieving high engine efficiency. One example is the well-known homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion engine, which operates with excessive air in the cylinder, and produces simultaneously low soot and NOx. However, HCCI combustion is found to be very sensitive to the flow and mixture conditions prior to the onset of auto-ignition. As a result, HCCI engine is rather difficult to control. At high load (with high temperature and high pressure) engine knock may occur with pressure waves in the cylinder interacting with the reaction fronts, leading to excessive noise and even damage on the cylinder and piston surface. At low load (with lower temperature and pressure) high level emissions of CO and unburned hydrocarbons may occur, which lowers the fuel efficiency and pollutes the environment. Recently, it has been demonstrated experimentally that with partially premixed charge compression ignition, also known as partially premixed combustion (PPC), smoother combustion can be achieved by managing the local fuel/air ratio (thereby the ignition delay time) in an overall lean charge.

    There are several technical barriers in applying the PPC concept to practical engines running with overall fuel-lean mixture, low temperature combustion. For example, it is not known what the optimized partially premixed charge is for a desirable ignition, while at the same time maintaining low emissions. The main difficulty lies in the non-linear behavior of the dominating phenomena and the interaction among them (e.g. chemistry and turbulence). To develop an applicable PPC technology for IC-engine industry, improved understanding of the multiple scale physical and chemical process is necessary. Further, there is a need to develop computational models for simulating the process for the design where a large number of control parameters are to be investigated.

    The goals of this project are to achieve improved understanding of the physical and chemical processes in overall fuel-lean PPC processes, and to generate reliable database for validating simulation models for analysis of the class of combustion problems. This shall lead to development of new strategies to achieve controllable low temperature combustion IC-engines, while maintaining high efficiency and low levels of emissions (soot, NOx, CO and unburned hydrocarbons). Direct numerical simulation (DNS) approach that employs detailed chemistry and transport properties will be used to study the mechanisms responsible for the onset of auto-ignition, and the structures and dynamics of the reaction front propagation in PPC conditions.

 

Call 9 (Tier-0)

Start date allocation: 2 September 2014; Allocation period: 1 year

  • Project title: PRACE4LOFAR
  • Project leader: Prof. Garrelt Mellema, Stockholm University, Sweden
  • Collaborators: Kyungjin Ahn, Chosun University, Republic of KOREA; Fabian Krause, University of Groningen, NETHERLANDS; Saleem Zaroubi, University of Groningen, NETHERLANDS; Hannes Jensen, Stockholm University, SWEDEN; Kai Yan Lee, Stockholm University, SWEDEN; Suman Majumdar, Stockholm University, SWEDEN; Keri Dixon, University of Sussex, UNITED KINGDOM; Ilian Iliev, University of Sussex, UNITED KINGDOM; Chaichalit Srisawat, University of Sussex, UNITED KINGDOM; David Sullivan, University of Sussex, UNITED KINGDOM
  • Resource awarded: 19 000 000 core hours on Curie TN (GENCI@CEA, France)
  • Abstract: Cosmic reionization is the process that took place 12 billion years ago when the first generations of stars and galaxies formed in the Universe. Ionizing radiation produced by stars and more extreme objects such as black holes, escaped from the galaxies and spread through the medium in between the galaxies. This process transformed this medium from entirely neutral to entirely ionized, which it has remained ever since. Reionization is at the forefront of modern cosmological research. Within the next few years we expect to transform our knowledge about this period through the detection of the redshifted 21cm radio signal from neutral hydrogen during reionization. The European radio interferometer array LOFAR is best placed to make this discovery. However, the discovery of the signal alone will need interpretation in terms of the properties and distribution of the galaxies that caused reionization. This PRACE proposal forms part of the efforts of the LOFAR-EoR Key Science Project and will provide the basic data needed to interpret the observations. We will perform several simulations with the main goal to simulate, for the very first time the full, very large volume of the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) survey of LOFAR, while at the same time including all essential types of ionizing sources, first stars, normal galaxies and QSOs. The structure formation data will be provided by an N-body simulation of early structure formation with 6912^3 (330 billion) particles and 500/h Mpc volume. This combination of large volume and high resolution will allow us to study the multi-scale reionization process, including effects which are either spatially very rare (e.g. luminous QSO sources) or for which the characteristic length scales are large (e.g. X-ray sources of photoionization and heating; the soft UV that radiatively pumps the 21-cm line by Lyman-alpha scattering; the H_2-dissociating UV background). We will complement the results from this simulation with results of smaller volumes which allow us to include the effects of structures not resolved in this very large volume. This structure formation simulation will be used in the LOFAR Epoch of Reionization Key Science Project to construct a large library of reionization simulations on non-PRACE facilities on which the interpretation of the LOFAR observations will be based. As part of this proposal we will use the structure formation results to perform reionization simulations which will address the likely stochastic nature of the sources of reionization, an aspect that to date has not been explored. We will also study the effects from the early rise of the inhomogeneous X-ray background and how much of this background is due to the first stars. The forming early galaxies, and the stars and accreting black holes within them emit copious amounts of radiation in all spectral bands, which in turn affects future star and galaxy formation. There are multiple channels for such feedback which need to be taken into account, an important one of which are the subtle, but far-reaching effects of X-rays which strongly modulate the redshifted 21-cm emission and absorption signals at early times.

  

Call 10 (Tier-0)

Start date allocation: 10 March 2015; Allocation period: 1 year

  • Project title: Transport properties and thermodynamic properties of ionic liquids
  • Project leader: Sten Sarman, Stockholm University, Sweden
  • Collaborators: Aatto Laaksonen, Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, SWEDEN; Yonglei Wang, Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, SWEDEN
  • Resource awarded: 10 000 000 core hours on Hornet (GCS@HLRS, Germany)
  • Abstract: The purpose of this project is to calculate the viscosity of ionic liquids consisting of an alkylated phosphonium ion and a borate ion. Such systems present a great potential for becoming the new generation of lubricants. Depending on subtle details of the actual structure of the phosphonium ions and the borate ions the rheological properties can vary considerably. This means that time-consuming synthesis and testing of many substances must be carried out in order to obtain lubricants with optimal properties. Therefore, it is necessary to perform molecular dynamics simulations to calculate thermodynamic data and transport coefficients, not least the viscosity, to guide the synthesis of new promising substances. 

    The most immediate way to calculate the last mentioned transport coefficient is to simulate a measurement in a real viscosimeter by performing shear flow simulations. This can be done by applying the SLLOD equations of motion, which are an exact description of adiabatic planar Couette flow. The viscosity is found by calculating the ratio of the shear stress and the shear rate a few different shear rates and extrapolating to zero shear rate. It is usually possible to find an interval where the shear rate is so low that the linear relation between the shear rate and shear stress still is valid and high enough to overwhelm the thermal fluctuations so that the signal-to-noise ratio remains nonzero. In the limit of zero shear rate, linear response theory can be used to derive a fluctuation relation or a Green-Kubo relation for the viscosity. This relation is a time integral of the time correlation function of the shear stress, which can be evaluated by ordinary equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    These two methods have successfully been applied to evaluate the viscosity of rather complex liquids such as various alkanes, which are components of lubricants. However, these systems consist of neutral molecules which is an advantage because all the molecular interactions are short ranged, so that there will be rather few interactions whereby the simulations become faster. Unfortunately, most molecules of practical interest are charged or display charge separation either because they include ions or there are differences between the electronegativities and electron affinities between different atoms in the molecule. Thus the atoms must be decorated by full or partial charges and Ewald summations must be undertaken in order to evaluate the electrostatic interactions correctly which slows down the simulation. Moreover, when irregular molecules such as the above mentioned phosphonium ions are present the relaxation times increase, so that longer simulations are needed. Thus it is not possible to let these simulations run on ordinary workstations or moderately large parallel processors available at many supercomputer centers. So far a force field has been developed for an atomistic model of the phosphonium ion and the borate ion. Preliminary simulations using available computational resources have shown that the model reproduces the thermodynamic properties and the viscosity very well compared to experimental measurements. However, in order to finish the project successfully much more computation time is needed.

 

Call 11 (Tier-0)

Start date allocation: 1 September 2015; Allocation period: 1 year

  • Project title: StratForce – Direct Numerical Simulations of forced stratified turbulence
  • Project leader: Erik Lindborg, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden
  • Collaborators: Geert Brethouwer, Royal Institute of Technology, SWEDEN; Andrea Maffioli, Royal Institute of Technology, SWEDEN; Peter Davidson, University Cambridge, UNITED KINGDOM; Pui-kuen Yeung, Georgia Institute of Technology, UNITED STATES
  • Resource awarded: 35 000 000 core hours on FERMI (CINECA, Italy)
  • Abstract: Flows in the upper troposphere and stratosphere are invariably stably stratified due to an increase in temperature with height. The large scales involved in atmospheric flows means that these flows are also turbulent therefore the study of stratified turbulence is important to understand the atmosphere dynamics at intermediate scales up to 100km, where the Earth’s rotation is unimportant. Within this project, we propose to perform simulations of stratified turbulence that for the first time resolve all the physical scales involved, from the large scales to the smallest dissipative scales. The results will form a reference against which theories have to be tested. They will allow us to understand the dynamics of overturning motions in the atmosphere, which can inform turbulence parametrizations for weather prediction. We also wish to study the vertical structure of these stratified turbulent flows, which could allow meteorologist to know, for example, how many vertical layers to choose for their global circulation model and ultimately improve our ability of weather forecasting.

 

Call 11 (Tier-0)

Start date allocation: 1 September 2015; Allocation period: 1 year

  • Project title: PFMPD – Planetesimal Formation in Magnetized Protoplanetary Disks
  • Project leader: Chao-Chin Yang, Lund University, Sweden
  • Collaborators: Bertram Bitsch, Lund University, SWEDEN; Daniel Carrera, Lund University, SWEDEN; Karl Jansson, Lund University, SWEDEN; Anders Johansen, Lund University, SWEDEN; Michiel Lambrechts, Lund University, SWEDEN; Katrin Ros, Lund University, SWEDEN; Mordecai-Mark Mac Low, American Museum of Natural History, UNITED STATES
  • Resource awarded: 15 000 000 core hours on MareNostrum (BSC, Spain)
  • Abstract: As of now, more than 1900 planets have been detected outside of our own solar system. However, a comprehensive picture of how they were born remains lacking. The reason is that the process of planet formation involves complicated interaction between solid materials, gaseous medium, and magnetic fields. To study this process, numerical simulations on high-performance computing facilities are required. In this research project, we focus on studying how kilometer-sized celestial objects called planetesimals were formed in such a complex environment. We will use a public computer program called the Pencil Code to simulate a system of numerous pebbles and boulders moving inside a magnetized gas disk. We will observe how these solid bodies can be concentrated to form larger bodies by a mechanism called the streaming instability. To achieve this goal, we have implemented several state-of-the-art numerical techniques for the Pencil Code. These new implementations will help us produce a pilot study of planetesimal formation in a magnetized protoplanetary disk.

 

Call 12 (Tier-0)

Start date allocation: 14 March 2016; Allocation period: 1 year

  • Project title: Numerical experiments in a “virtual wind tunnel”: LES of the flow around a wing section at high Re
  • Project leader: Philipp Schlatter, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden
  • Collaborators: Ardeshir Hanifi, Linné Flow Centre, Swedish e-Science Research Centre, SWEDEN; Dan Henningson, Linné Flow Centre, Swedish e-Science Research Centre, SWEDEN; Prabal S. Negi, Linné Flow Centre, Swedish e-Science Research Centre, SWEDEN; Ricardo Vinuesa, Linné Flow Centre, Swedish e-Science Research Centre, SWEDEN
  • Resource awarded: 31 000 000 core hours on MareNostrum (BSC, Spain)
  • Abstract: A recent report by NASA discusses a number of findings and recommendations regarding the present and future role of CFD (computational fluid dynamics) in aircraft design. The main revelations point out the necessity of accurate predictions of turbulent flows with significantly separated regions for both analysis and optimization procedures. Industrial computations of aircraft components are mainly based on Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations, where turbulence is modeled relying on empirical arguments. This approach only allows proper characterization of simple flow features (such as lift and drag) after proper tuning based on equivalent wind tunnel tests. It is only (temporally and spatially) resolved simulations that are able to properly characterize the mentioned flow features with the accuracy necessary for engineering design. The present proposal exactly addresses the proof of concept of performing such a simulation at relevant Reynolds number for industrial applications, which could significantly impact engineering optimization strategies. Available numerical studies of the flow around wing sections are limited to low Reynolds numbers up to around Rec=100,000. Our research group has recently finalized a fully resolved high-order DNS of the flow around a NACA4412 wing profile at Rec=400,000 with 5 degree angle of attack, using the massively-parallel spectral-element code Nek5000. The relevance of this flow case lies in the higher Reynolds number compared with other studies, and in the additional flow complexity introduced by the cambered airfoil. The scope of the proposed study is to perform a high-fidelity wall-resolved LES of the flow around a NACA4412 wing profile at an unprecedented Reynolds number Rec=1,000,000 with 5 degree angle of attack. These results would exceed by an order of magnitude other numerical databases available in the literature, and the generated database would be of great value to the study of complex wall-bounded turbulent flows, but also to the development of more sophisticated RANS models for industrial use. Our research group has already been able to successfully perform an LES validation in zero pressure gradient (ZPG) turbulent boundary layers. With this simulation we will provide a full description of the flow around the wing profile at a Reynolds typical of university wind tunnel experiments. The simulation proposed here is part of a larger effort to simulate flows around wings. Related projects where transition is not set at a specific location, but left free to move are done for oscillating or pitching airfoils. These are of high relevance for e.g. long endurance aircraft where the transition may move over large portions of the wings and influence the forces at the control surfaces. The motion of the transition line often experiences hysteresis and is therefore very difficult to predict, in particular with traditional CFD methods. The simulations performed in this project and the LES tested will be of paramount importance for the further development of such more complicated high-fidelity wing simulations.

 

Call 14 (Tier-0)

Start date allocation: 14 March 2016; Allocation period: 1 year

  • Project title: HETS/Heat (and Mass) Transfer in Turbulent Suspensions
  • Project leader: Luca Brandt, SE
  • Resource Awarded: 18.3 million core hours on Marconi – KNL
  • Team Members:
    Università degli Studi di Padova – IT
    TU Delft University of Technology – NL
    SINTEF (APPLIED RESEARCH, TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION) – NO
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology – SE
  • Abstract: The aim of the project is to perform interface-resolved numericalsimulations of heat transfer in turbulent channel flow of dropletsuspensions, with and without evaporation. Multiphase flows with heat transfer and phase change are encountered in many applications such asspray dryers, scrubbers and liquid spray combustion. Different transport processes are active in these flows and these interact with each otherin a complicated manner, thus creating a challenge in modelling andsimplifying the problem. In particular the addition of solid particlesor droplet can affect the mixing significantly, an effect which cannot be modelled by available formulations in the literature. Therefore, weaim to use Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) in order to investigatethe details of the heat transfer problem in the presence of rigid/deformable particles/droplets including phase change in a secondstage of the project. The work is part of the ERC grant ERC-2013-CoG-616186, TRITOS to Prof Brandt concerning particle suspensions, with a significant extension to include the thermodynamics of phase change. In particular we will start by investigating the effect of the presence of particles on the heat transfer in a turbulent flow, taking the phase change into account in the next step of this study. To tackle this highly relevant and unexplored process, we assume particles that shrink/swell due to evaporation/condensation while maintaining the spherical symmetry. It should be noted that this assumption is justified when the droplets are sufficiently small and the surface tension force larger than inertia and viscous forces (small Capillary and Webernumbers). One of the goals of this study is to validate a novel numerical tool to attack this problem for a wider range of parameters.The Immersed Boundary Method (IBM) will be used in this study to resolvethe interface between gas and liquid for velocity, temperature andvapour mass fraction in the domain beside a Lagrangian approach to transport the mass centre of the particles. An indicator function will be used to express the dependency of the fluid material properties on the phase. The code has been parallelized, validated and shown to havean almost linear scaling with the number of processors. The work proposed will be performed in close collaboration between the groups of Prof Brandt at KTH Mechanics, Stockholm, Prof Breugem in TU/Delft, the Netherlands, and Dr. Gruber at SINTEF, Norway, the largest independent research organisation in Scandinavia.

 

Call 14 (Tier-0)

Start date allocation: 14 March 2016; Allocation period: 1 year

  • Project title: Direct numerical simulation of partially premixed combustion in internal
    combustion engine relevant conditions
  • Project leader: Xue-Song Bai, SE
  • Resource Awarded: 42.4 million core hours on Juqueen
  • Team Members: Lund University – SE
  • Abstract: In the past decade, the European and world engine industry and researchcommunity have spent a great effort in developing clean combustion engines using the concept of fuel-lean mixture and low temperature combustion which offers great potential in reducing NOx (due to low temperature), soot and unburned hydrocarbon (due to excessive air), and meanwhile achieving high engine efficiency. One example is the well-known homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustionengine, which operates with excessive air in the cylinder, and produces simultaneously low soot and NOx. However, HCCI combustion is found to bevery sensitive to the flow and mixture conditions prior to the onset of auto-ignition. As a result, HCCI engine is rather difficult to control. At high load (with high temperature and high pressure) engine knock may occur with pressure waves in the cylinder interacting with the reactionfronts, leading to excessive noise and even damage on the cylinder and piston surface. At low load (with lower temperature and pressure) high level emissions of CO and unburned hydrocarbons may occur, which lowers the fuel efficiency and pollutes the environment. Recently, it has been demonstrated experimentally that with partially premixed charge compression ignition, also known as partially premixed combustion (PPC), smoother combustion can be achieved by managing the local fuel/air ratio(thereby the ignition delay time) in an overall lean charge. There are several technical barriers in applying the PPC concept to practical engines running with overall fuel-lean mixture, low temperature combustion. For example, it is not known what the optimized partially premixed charge is for a desirable ignition, while at the same time maintaining low emissions. The main difficulty lies in the non-linearbehavior of the dominating phenomena and the interaction among them(e.g. chemistry and turbulence). To develop an applicable PPC technology for IC-engine industry, improved understanding of the multiple scalephysical and chemical process is necessary. Further, there is a need to develop computational models for simulating the process for the design where a large number of control parameters are to be investigated. The goals of this project are to achieve improved understanding of the physical and chemical processes in overall fuel-lean PPC processes, and to generate reliable database for validating simulation models for analysis of the class of combustion problems. This shall lead todevelopment of new strategies to achieve controllable low temperature combustion IC-engines, while maintaining high efficiency and low levels of emissions (soot, NOx, CO and unburned hydrocarbons). Direct numerical simulation (DNS) approach that employs detailed chemistry and transport properties will be used to study the mechanisms responsible for the onset of auto-ignition, and the structures and dynamics of the reaction front propagation in PPC conditions.

 

 



PRACE TIER-0 PREPARATORY ACCESS WITH SWEDISH PROJECT LEADER

Successful applications with Swedish collaborators are also listed.

3rd and 4th cut-off evaluation in March and May 2011

  • Project Title: Visualization of output from large-scale brain simulation
    Principal Investigator: Anders Lansner, Simon Benjaminsson and David Silverstein, Computational Biology, KTH, Stockholm, Sweden
    Research area: Medicine and Life Sciences (Computational Biology)
    Grant: 250 000 core-hours on Jugene, Gauss/FZJ
    Access type: Type C – Code development with support from experts from PRACE
  • Project Title: Radiative Feedback from Early Cosmic Structures
    Principal Investigator: Llian Lliev, University of Sussex, Physics and Astronomy, Brighton, UK
    Collaborators:: Garrelt Mellema, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden / Kyungjin Ahn, Chosun University, Gwangju, South Korea
    Research area: Astrophysics
    Grant: 50 000 core hours on Curie (GENCI@CEA, France)
    Access type: Type A - Code scalability testing
  • Project Title: Turbulent convection and dynamos in spherical wedges
    Principal Investigator: Petri Käpylä, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
    Collaborators:: Maarit Mantere, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland / Axel Brandenburg, Nordita, Stockholm, Sweden / Piyali Chatterjee, Nordita, Stockholm, Sweden / Gustavo Guerrero, Nordita, Stockholm, Sweden / Dhrubaditya Mitra, Nordita, Stockholm, Sweden
    Research area: Astrophysics
    Grant: 200 000 core hours on Curie (GENCI@CEA, France)
    Access type: Type C – Code development with support from experts from PRACE

 

8th cut-off evaluation in March 2012

  • Project Title: Grand Challenging simulations in materials science
    Principal Investigator: Sven Öberg, Luleå University of Technology
    Collaborators:: Mark Rayson, Luleå University of Technology (SE), Patrick Briddon, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne (UK)
    Research area: Chemistry and Materials
    Grant: 100 000 GPU hours on Curie Hybrid Nodes (GENCI@CEA, France) and 50 000 core hours on Hermit (GCS@HLRS, Germany)
    Access type: Type B – Code development and optimization by the applicant (without PRACE support)
  • Project Title: Scalability of ANSYS Fluent for an industrial application of turbulent mass transport at Tetra Pak
    Principal Investigator: Wim Slagter, ANSYS Inc., the Netherlands
    Collaborators:: Tobias Berg, ANSYS Sweden AB, Sweden
    Research area: Chemistry and Materials
    Grant: 50 000 core-hours on HERMIT (GCS@HLRS, Germany)
    Access type: Type A - Code scalability testing

 

10th cut-off evaluation in September 2012

  • Project Title: Automated Network Topology Identification and Topology Aware MPI Collectives
    Principal Investigator: Chandan Basu, Linköping University
    Collaborators:: Soon-Heum Ko and Johan Raber, Linköping University
    Research area: Mathematics and Computer Science
    Grant: 200 000 core hours on CURIE (GENCI/CEA, France)
    Access type: Type B – Code development and optimization by the applicant (without PRACE support)

 

11th cut-off evaluation in December 2012

  • Project Title: Direct numerical simulations of solar and stellar differential rotation and dynamos
    Principal Investigator: Petri Kapyla, University of Helsinki, Finland
    Collaborators:: Mantere Maarit, Cole Elizabeth, University of Helsinki, Finland; Warnecke Jorn, Brandenburg Axel, NORDITA, Sweden
    Research area: Astrophysics
    Grant: 50 000 core hours on HERMIT (GCS@HLRS, Germany)
    Access type: Type A - Code scalability testing

 

12th cut-off evaluation in March 2013

  • Project Title:  Dimerization of the beta-2-Adrenegentic Receptor Protein in Different Membrane Environments Studied Through Multiscale Molecular Modeling
    Principal Investigator:  Alexander Lyubartsev, Stockholm University, Sweden
    Collaborators:: Joakim Jambeck, Stockholm University, Sweden
    Research area: Chemistry and Materials
    Grant: 50 000 core hours on HERMIT (GCS@HLRS, Germany) and 100 000 core hours on JUQUEEN (GCS@FZJ, Germany)
    Access type: Type A - Code scalability testing
  • Project Title: HPMC - High-Performance Monte Carlo for nuclear reactors
    Principal Investigator: Victor Hugo Sanchez Espinoza, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
    Collaborators:: Hoogenboom Eduard, Delft Nuclear Consultancy, NL; Dufek Jan, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden; Leppanen Jaakko, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Finland
    Research area: Engineering and Energy
    Grant: 250 000 core hours on JUQUEEN (GCS@FZJ, Germany)
    Access type: Type B – Code development and optimization by the applicant (without PRACE support)
  • Project Title: Scalability of gyrofluid components within a multi-scale framework
    Principal Investigator: Bruce Scott, Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Euratom Association, Germany
    Collaborators:: Hoenen Olivier, Coster David, Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Euratom Association, Germany; Strand Pär, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden
    Research area:  Engineering and Energy
    Grant:
    Access type: Type C – Code development with support from experts from PRACE
  • Project Title: Explicit solvent Molecular Dynamics Simulation of ribosome unit with Gromacs
    Principal Investigator: Leandar Litov, University of Sofia "St. Kliment Ohridski", Bulgaria
    Collaborators:: Apostolov Rossen, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden
    Research area:  Medicine and Life Sciences
    Grant: 250 000 core hours on JUQUEEN (GCS@FZJ, Germany) and 250 000 core hours on FERMI (CINECA, Italy)
    Access type: Type C – Code development with support from experts from PRACE

 

15th cut-off evaluation in December 2013

  • Project Title: Swept wing simulation in a virtual wind tunnel
    Principal Investigator: Dr Philipp Schlatter; Linné FLOW Centre, Sweden
    Collaborators:: Dr. Ismaël Bouya, Dr. Matthew de Stadler, Dr. Ardeshir Hanifi, Prof. Dan Henningson,; Linné FLOW Centre, Sweden
    Research area: Engineering and Energy
    Grant: 250 000 core hours on FERMI (CINECA, Italy); 100 000 core hours on MareNostrum (BSC, Spain); 200 000 core hours on Curie Thin Nodes (GENCI, France); 50 000 core hours on HERMIT (GCS@HLRS, Germany); 250 000 core hours on JUQUEEN (GCS@FZJ, Germany); 250,000 core hours on SuperMUC (GCS@LRZ, Germany)
    Access type: Type B – Code development and optimization by the applicant (without PRACE support)
  • Project Title: Profiling and Scalability Analysis of Linear Scaling DALTON Code for Large Molecular Simulation of Biological Interest
    Principal Investigator: Dr. Soon-Heum Ko, Linköping University, Sweden
    Collaborators:: Dr. Thomas Kjærgaard, Aarhus University Denmark and Dr. Simen Reine, University of Oslo, Norway
    Research area: Chemistry and Materials
    Grant: 200 000 core hours on Curie Thin Nodes (GENCI@CEA, France)
    Access type: Type B – Code development and optimization by the applicant (without PRACE support)

 

16th cut-off evaluation in March 2014

  • Project Title: HPMC - High-Performance Monte Carlo for nuclear reactor safety 
    Principal Investigator: Dr. Victor Hugo Sanchez Espinoza; Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
    Collaborators: Mr. Aleksandar Ivanov; Dr Anton Travleev; Dr Jaakko Leppanen; Dr Eduard Hoogenboom; Dr Jan Dufek (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology – DE; VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland – FI; Delft Nuclear Consultancy – NL; KTH Royal Institute of Technology – SE)  
    Research area: Engineering and Energy 
    Grant: 250 000 core hours on SuperMUC (GCS@LRZ, Germany)
    Access type: Type B – Code development and optimization by the applicant (without PRACE support)
 
 
 

18th cut-off evaluation in October 2014

 
  • Project Title: Accelerating Nek5000 with optimized OpenACC directives
    Principal Investigator: Dr Jing Gong, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SWEDEN 
    Collaborators: Mr Michael Schliephake, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SWEDEN 
    Research area: Mathematics and Computer Science
    Grant: 100 000 GPU core hours on Curie Hybrid Nodes (GENCI@CEA, France)
    Access type: Type B – Code development and optimization by the applicant (without PRACE support)

 


 

Type D (Tier-1 for Tier0) Preparatory Access 

Type-D project 1st cut-off

  1. Project Title: Automation of high fidelity CFD analysis for aircraft design and optimization
    Project leader: Dr. Mengmeng Zhang
    Company: Airinnova AB, 559020-7345
    Allocation: One year allocation on ARCHER, EPCC, UK

    Abstract: Airinnvoa is a company to develop computational solutions foraerodynamic shape optimization, which is an important task in aircraftdesign. The high fidelity CFD (computational fluid dynamics) analysis isa major tool for modern aircraft design and optimization, and thecomputational power is a limiting factor. To carry out the high fidelityCFD requires the engineers have special skills in making mesh andexecute the analysis code, which constraints the use of the CFD analysisonly to a limited number of people. The goal of the proposed project isto help engineers to design the aircraft in a more efficient and simplerway by making the core processes automatic.

    Airinnova has been conducting the PRACE SHAPE project with collaborationwith PRACE partner SNIC-KTH. The outcome of the research work has been presented in an AIAA conference paper. In this proposed project, we will follow from our previously work and take advantage of the optimization results and the existing scripts. In the proposed project, we will continue to carry out the high fidelity CFD analysis (RANS), with emphasizing running CFD in an automation way by starting from a watertight aircraft geometry. Gradient-based optimization algorithms by solving the adjoint-based equations will be applied to the final step of the automation process, which allows the flexibility integrate the whole automation process into a MDO(Multi-Disciplinary Optimization) design environment.

    The tasks mainly consist of:
    1. Automation process development: Develop the automation process bystarting from a watertight Common Research Model (CRM) aircraft geometry with designed pylons and nacelles.
    2. Benchmark: performance analysis for the desired model using proposed automation process including auto-meshing and CFD solver auto-run.
    3. Port: deploy and run on a PRACE Tier1 system and prepare for Tier-0system


 

PRACE TIER-1 (DECI) ACCESS WITH SWEDISH PROJECT LEADER

Successful applications with Swedish collaborators (but not with a Swedish project leader) are not listed.

DECI-7

Start date allocation: 1 November 2011; Allocation period: 1 year

  1. Project Title: DiSMuN: Diffusion and spectroscopical properties of multicomponent nitrides 
    Principal Investigator: Prof. Igor Abrikosov, LiU
    Research area: Materials science
    Allocation: 3 750 000 standard DECI hours (SNIC/PDC, Sweden; SARA, Netherlands)
  2. Project Title: SPIESM: Seasonal Prediction Improvement with an Earth System Model 
    Principal Investigators: Dr Colin Jones (SMHI) and Prof. Francisco Doblas-Reyes
    Research field: Earth Sciences and Environment
    Allocation: 3 750 000 standard DECI hours (SNIC/PDC, Sweden)
  3. Project Title: MUSIC
    Principal Investigator: Dr. Mikael Djurfeldt, KTH and INCF
    Research field: Computational Neuroscience
    Allocation: 231 000 standard DECI hours (GENCI/IDRIS, France)
  4. Project Title: SIVE-2
    Principal Investigator: Prof. Erik Lindahl, SU and KTH
    Research area: Biosciences: molecular dynamics simulation of viral entry
    Allocation: 6 250 000 standard DECI hours (EPCC, UK)


DECI-8

Start date allocation: 1 May 2012; Allocation period: 1 year

  1. Project Title: PIPETURB (Large scale simulation of turbulent pipe flow)
    Principal Investigator: Dr. Philipp Schlatter, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology
    Research area:  Mechanical Engineering, Fluid Dynamics
    Allocation: 6 250 000 standard DECI hours (CSC, Finland; EPCC, UK)
  2. Project Title: PLANETESIM (Towards an initial mass function of planetesimals)
    Principal Investigator: Dr. Anders Johansen, Lund University
    Research field: Astro Science
    Allocation: 6 200 054 standard DECI hours (GCS/RZG, Germany; GCS/FZJ, Germany; ICHEC, Ireland)
  3. Project Title: CANONS (Comprehensive Ab initio studies of Nitride and Oxide fuels and Nuclear Structural materials)
    Principal Investigator: Dr. Pär Olsson, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology
    Research field: Materials Science
    Allocation: 3 125 000 standard DECI hours (CSCS, Switzerland)
  4. Project Title: MBIOMARK (Multifunctional biomarkers for electron paramagnetic resonance imaging)
    Principal Investigator: Dr. Zilvinas Rinkevicius, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology
    Research area: Materials Science
    Allocation: 1 875 000 standard DECI hours (CSCS, Switzerland)

 

DECI-9

Start date allocation: 1 November 2012; Allocation period: 1 year

  1. Project Title: CoStAFuM (Computational Studies of Advanced Functional Materials)
    Principal Investigator: Prof. Olle Eriksson, Uppsala University
    Research area: Materials Science
    Allocation: 9 687 608 standard DECI hours (NTNU, Norway; RZG, Germany)
  2. Project Title: DifVib (Diffusion in multicomponent nitrides and vibrational thermodynamics from first-principles)
    Principal Investigator: Prof. Igor Abrikosov, Linköping University
    Research area: Materials Science
    Allocation: 6 250 000 standard DECI hours (SNIC/PDC, Sweden; EPCC, UK)
  3. Project Title: HydFoEn (Hydrogen storage materials for energy applications) - CANCELED
    Principal Investigator: Prof. Rajeev Ahuja, Uppsala University
    Research area: Materials Science
    Allocation: 2 501 125 standard DECI hours (UHEM, Turkey)

 

DECI-10

Start date allocation: 1 May 2013; Allocation period: 1 year

  1. Project Title: DNSTF (Direct numerical simulation of finite size fibres in turbulent flow)
    Principal Investigator: Prof. Gustav Amberg, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology
    Research area: Mechanical Engineering, Fluid Mechanics
    Allocation: 8 437 500 standard DECI hours (EPCC, UK)
  2. Project Title: LipoSim (Large scale simulations of liposomes as drug carriers)
    Principal Investigator: Prof. Leif A. Eriksson, University of Gothenburg
    Research area: Materials Science (Drug Design)
    Allocation: 8 750 000 standard DECI hours (PDC, Sweden)
  3. Project Title: MEGAREACT (Metal catalysed gasification reactions)
    Principal Investigator: Prof. Kim Bolton, University of Borås
    Research area: Materials Science
    Allocation:  750 000 standard DECI hours (UiO, Norway)
  4. Project Title: PLANETESIM-2 (Towards an initial mass function of planetesimals)
    Principal Investigator: Dr. Anders Johansen, Lund University
    Research area: Astro Science
    Allocation: 7 500 000 standard DECI hours (GCS/FZJ, Germany)

 

DECI-11

Start date allocation: 1 November 2013; Allocation period: 1 year

  1. Project Title: FLOCS - Fully Localised Edge States in Boundary Layers
    Principal Investigator: Dr. Philipp Schlatter, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology
    Research area: Mechanical Engineering
    Allocation: 12 500 000 standard DECI hours on Archer (EPCC, UK)
  2. Project Title: GSTP - Global Gyrokinetic simulation of tokamak plasmas
    Principal Investigator: Prof. Hans Nordman, Chalmers University of Technology
    Research area: Plasma and Particle physics
    Allocation: 5 000 000 standard DECI hours on JuRoPA (GCS/FZJ, Germany)

 

DECI-12

Start date allocation: 1 May 2014; Allocation period: 1 year

  1. Project Title: FENICS-HPC - High performance adaptive finite element methods for turbulent flow and multi-physics with industrial applications
    Principal Investigator: Prof. Johan Hoffman, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology and Vattenfall
    Research area: Mechanical Engineering
    Allocation: 1 250 000 standard DECI hours (PDC, Sweden)
  2. Project Title: DNSTF2 - Direct numerical simulation of finite size fibres in turbulent flow
    Principal Investigator: Prof. Gustav Amberg, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology
    Research area: Mechanical Engineering, Fluid Dynamics
    Allocation: 6 250 000 standard DECI hours (CSC, Finland)
  3. Project Title: ParaWEM - Assessment of the Wave Expansion Method for acoustics in engineering problems
    Principal Investigator: Assistant Prof. Ciarán O’Reilly, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology
    Research area: Aerodynamics
    Allocation:  3 750 000 standard DECI hours (EPCC, UK)
  4. Project Title: VFEH 
    Principal Investigator: Prof. Deliang Chen, University of Gothenburg
    Research area: Earth Science
    Allocation: 500 000 standard DECI hours (EPCC, UK)
  5. Project Title: EXODUS - GraphEne oXide as a transpOrter of Drug molecUleS
    Principal Investigator: Dr. Biplab Sanyal, Uppsala University
    Research area: Materials Science
    Allocation: 3 750 000 standard DECI hours (Cyfronet, Poland; Castorc, Cyprus)

 

DECI-13

Start date allocation: 01March 2016; Allocation period: 1 year

  1. Project Title: PIPESUB - Large scale simulation of subcritical transition in pipe flow 
    Principal Investigator: Dr. Philipp Schlatter, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden
    Research area: Engineering
    Allocation: 20 000 000 core hours on SiSu (CSC, Finland)
  2. Project Title: GraSiC - Engineering the electronic properties of epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001) via intercalation and molecular transfer doping
    Principal Investigator: Dr. Nuala Caffrey, Linköping University, Sweden
    Research area: Material Sciences
    Allocation: 7 000 000 core hours on Archer (EPCC, UK)
  3. Project Title: MMIC - Multiscale Modelling of Ionic Conductors 
    Principal Investigator: Prof. Natalia Skorodumova, KTH - Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden
    Research area: Material Sciences
    Allocation:  13 727 000 core hours on Salomon (VSB-TUO, Czech Republic)
  4. Project Title: NTCPROJ - Near term climate projections in high resolution 
    Principal Investigator: Mr. Ralf Döscher, SMHI, Sweden
    Research area: Earth Sciences
    Allocation: 18 000 000 core hours on Archer (EPCC, UK)
  5. Project Title: CHARTERED - CHARge TransfER dynamics by time dependEnt Density functional theory 
    Principal Investigator: Dr. Biplab Sanyal, Uppsala university, Sweden
    Research area: Material Sciences
    Allocation: 16,800,000 + 6,720,000 + 84,000 core hours on Salomon (VSB-TUO, Czech Republic)

 Total SUM: 82 331 000 DECI standard core hours, equaling 20 582 750 core hours on SNIC resource Beskow. 

 

DECI-14
Start date allocation: 01 May 2017; Allocation period: 1 year

  1. Project Title: MMICSCTSET - ultiscale Modelling of Ionic Conductors –
    Structure, Conductivity and Thermodynamic Stability at Elevated
    Temperatures
    Principal Investigator: Prof. Natalia Skorodumova, KTH - Royal Institute
    of Technology, Sweden
    Research area: Material Sciences
    Allocation:  23 284 800 core hours on Salomon (VSB-TUO, Czech Republic)
  2. Project Title: CHARTERED2 - CHARge TransfER dynamics by time
    dependEnt Density functional theory2
    Principal Investigator: Dr. Biplab Sanyal, Uppsala university, Sweden
    Research area: Material Sciences
    Allocation: 23,100,000 + 6,720,000 + 84,000 core hours on Salomon
    (VSB-TUO, Czech Republic)

 

SHAPE PROJECTS WITH SWEDISH PARTICIPATION
 

SHAPE (SME HPC Adoption Programme in Europe) is a pan-European programme supported by PRACE which aims to raise awareness and provide European SMEs with the expertise necessary to take advantage of the innovation possibilities created by HPC, thus increasing their competitiveness. 

 

Call 3

Successful applicants have access to PRACE resources as of 7 March 2016.

  1. Project Title: High level optimization in aerodynamic design
    Company: Airinnova AB, Sweden
  2. Project Title: Large scale aero-acoustics applications using open source CFD
    Company: Creo Dynamics AB


 

Document Actions
« June 2017 »
June
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30
More events…